Monday, February 05, 2007

Appropriation: The World of Lorecraft...

From Spelljammer to Cthulhu to Darwin...

7 comments:

Don Jason said...

The freaks have really put some effort into this. It is rather third rate writing but fun nonetheless.

Mr. Alex said...

For starting out ten years ago with a rather basic (as far as story goes) Orks VS Humans RTS, they've really done a good job of fleshing out their game world with borrowed themes and texture, but in a way that doesn't make said themes seem generic. I wonder how much this has to do with the visual style they've selected, itself a mixture of "cartoon" and "grim fantasy" appropriated from other sources...

Pete said...

There's nothing wrong with generic fantasy for gaming, anyhow. It's healthy for a RPG to start with a base set of assumptions and conflicts, regardless of genre. The big difference I found with online gaming, from paper-and-pencil play, is the lack of traditional story structure, which is the lynch pin of campaign design. Y'know, beyond having "boss monsters" and "quests". This isn't as much a drawback as it is the nature of the medium. I think there it's imperative that future games of this type provide as much creative possibilities for players as possible.
Did Warcrack ever take steps towards the "everybody's a hero/an anti-hero" problem?

Mr. Alex said...

Did Warcrack ever take steps towards the "everybody's a hero/an anti-hero" problem?

No, and, as a result, everyone looks like a roadie for GWAR...

Pete said...

I'm sorry my last comment was something of a non-sequiter, and brought up very basic issues. I sure that you guys have thought just as much or more about this medium as I have. I'm a bit brain addled from working a lot.

I want to add a few caveats to the bit about player creativity. It's best if the creative activity happens during game play. Making game content out-of-game then importing it is a non-social activity. If you import the creative elements into the game, then you need to facilitate collaboration by some mechanic. Alex thought of a good way, in that different game characters would have access different types of technology and materials. (This is assuming that the creative element is centered around building objects and environments. It very well might not be.) Lastly, game activities must be fun. Collaboration results in the fun or enthusiasm of one player adding to the fun of others. This is the opposite of "griefing" which is one player having fun at the other's expense.

There's a freeware shooter called "Cube" which has a simple modeling interface you can switch in and out of during game play. I wonder if it's any fun.

Mr. Alex said...

Lastly, game activities must be fun. Collaboration results in the fun or enthusiasm of one player adding to the fun of others.

One of the scripted events that happens every hour or so in one of the new Burning Crusade zones is a shambling undead ("Brains!!") attack on an Elven outpost which all of the players at said outpost can either flee from or collectively help repel. Good stuff!

Pete said...

The "Get out of here, I'll hold them off!" moments in the Shield Lands were always fun, too.